3D Printing %%%%

Category: 3D Printing

21 Aug 2018
Humanetics | 3D Printing | Adaptive Corp.

Crash Test Dummies Featured in Thomas Industry Video

Humanetics ATD, a manufacturer of crash test dummies is making a big splash in the Additive Manufacturing press. Adaptive featured Humanetics and their elderly dummy in a recent case study. The article described how they used the Markforged Mark II 3D printer and the ONYX material in the manufacturing process.

Thomas Industry Updates produced their own video starring our beloved elderly crash test dummies.

Watch the video taking the additive manufacturing industry by storm.

16 Jul 2018

Modern Machine Shop Reprint: Toolmaker uses 3D printing to produce composite workholding fixtures

Read how an Adaptive customer solved their production bottleneck challenges with 3D printing in a recent article published on the Modern Machine Shop website.

Elliott Tool is a tube tool and burnishing product manufacturer located in Dayton, Ohio. They were having difficulties keeping up with the demand for custom fixtures and dies to meet their customer orders. They turned to Markforged and their Mark Two 3D printing system to ease their production bottleneck. They were so impressed with the lightweight ONYX material they began using 3D printing for their end use parts.

Read More…

10 May 2018

Adaptive in the News: Design2Part A New Era of 3D Printing

In this Design2Part article, Frank Thomas explains how 3D Printing has evolved as a valid approach for manufacturers to enhance their agility on the plant floor by employing 3D printing for additive manufacturing. Whether they create replacement parts, tooling or jigs, the advancements in the durability of materials has enabled 3D Printing to be a dependable solution that is more affordable than ever before. Here are a few excerpts from Frank:

Thomas said that until fairly recently, additive manufacturing was used most often as a tool to create parts that you could hand to somebody so that they could see it, touch it, and provide some input as to what might need to be changed or modified. But that’s changed in recent years as new materials have been developed that enable printers to make stronger, more durable parts.

“Metal printing has always been there, but that has an economic value proposition that’s a bit challenging for it,” he said in an interview. “The ABS and nylon and other plastic 3D printers, up until the last couple of years, weren’t necessarily dimensionally accurate, and then they had challenges creating a part that’s functional. That’s what I think is different about the market today, compared to just, really, a couple of years ago.”

If the demand for 3D printed metal parts is going to grow significantly, especially for critical use cases, OEMs will have to be able to count on high-quality parts. Thomas believes the additive metal industry is up to the challenge because he’s already seen major improvements in quality in recent years.

“At the end of the day, this is really a materials game. If the materials that we’re able to bring to the market provide the end use quality that people are looking for, that’s critical.”

Read the entire article here

09 Apr 2018

Overcoming Manufacturing Challenges with Composite & Metal 3D Printing

Both composite 3D printing and metal 3D printing are invaluable resources on the production line. They are often used to affordably and efficiently produce many of the low volume, high-strength, custom parts critical to manufacturing. In this paper from Markforged, you’ll learn how composite and metal 3D printing technologies can work together to optimize your digital manufacturing processes.

Examples of 3D printed tooling applications include:

  • Conformal Workholding for Metal Printed Parts

If a part can be 3D printed in metal, conformal workholding for the part can easily follow. Printing composite workholding for processing metal 3D printed parts solves the conformal work holding problem efficiently-whether for tapping, post machining, or QA inspection.

  • Tooling, Jigs and Fixtures

Using industrial 3D printers for tools, jigs, and fixtures can drop costs and cut lead time by over 90%, delivering high­strength, long-lasting parts next day.

Breaking your tools down into material-specific regions can optimize their properties while dropping cost and time to manufacture. Below are some properties that can be localized by splitting parts into metal and composite segments.

Download the white paper to explore application use cases from conformal workholding to tooling inserts, and discover how composite and metal 3D printing technologies from Markforged can help you overcome common tooling and fixturing roadblocks.

 

Here are a couple other related blog posts that may be of interest:

Not Just for Parts: Additive Manufacturing Delivers Benefits with Tooling

Additive Manufacturing Deep Dive (Part 2): Every Part is Custom