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Category: Industries

25 Mar 2020

Solving High Tech’s Top Six Critical Business Issues (eBook)

A recent ebook from Tech-Clarity, “Solving High Tech’s Top Six Critical Business Issues,” reinforces what many in the high-tech product development world know: it’s a tough marketplace out there. New technologies offer exciting opportunities for innovation, but they also create implicit requirements for companies whose success depends on responding to ever-changing consumer desires.

This is a particular challenge given that lack of response to market trends could mean irrelevance and even obsolescence. In the drive to make connected, smart products, the pressure is on to be first or early to the market to capture share, but also to deliver something new and exciting for the market. We are all aware of products we once used that are no longer in existence. I was an early adopter of the PalmPilot (several versions), now they are nowhere. One study projects that 50% of the current S&P 500 will be replaced over the next decade. It happens to the best of them… Polaroid, Prime, DEC, Wang, just to name a few. No one wants that to happen to their company.

What are the critical business issues that organizations need to address to prepare for the future? Tech-Clarity identifies six:

1. Taking cost out

It is noted that 70% of a product’s cost gets locked in during the design cycle.  Are you using the right tools to fully optimize your design? Using a platform of simulation tools like 3DEXPERIENCE will help design teams fully assess a given design such as the best material, the ideal weight, the full load anticipated, hot spots on boards.  Identifying these characteristics early in the design process will play a significant role in designing right the first time before producing a prototype.

Top Engineering Challenges in High Tech Source: Tech-Clarity

2. Avoiding quality problems

One solution to this is creating a single source of truth for data management. In a separate study, Tech-Clarity found that 20% of time engineers are not working with the right data. This is a big issue for high tech who have mechanical, electrical and systems engineers working on the same project. Using a collaborative PLM platform that manages all product data will enable greater team efficiency and reduce quality issues down the line.

3. Achieving shorter product development schedules

Productivity gains rarely happen by maintaining current processes. When the right process changes get put into place, significant gains can be realized. Creating a collaborative design process ensures that all the teams have access to the right data when it’s needed. In high tech, a combined ECAD-MCAD platform is the key to bringing all the pieces together to shorten the design cycle and mitigate risks by putting the right checkpoints in place. Tech-Clarity identifies that 23% of the time engineers spend their time just “looking” for the right information. This gets even more time consuming when companies have multiple systems to check. A platform approach like 3DEXPERIENCE can remove these roadblocks and increase the throughput of all involved.

4. Facilitating innovation

Being nimble and agile is critical for high tech companies due to the rapidly changing needs of their consumers. Many design teams need to pivot off a current design but improve on it and create more interesting capabilities. Managing across engineering disciplines is critical for facilitating innovation and enables cross-pollination of ideas. Having an ideation repository can help spur new approaches to old designs along with a platform that manages data and other information in one place to support real-time collaboration.

Cost Impact of Design Changes Source: Tech-Clarity

5. Ensuring performance and reliability

Heat and vibration are the two biggest culprits that cause performance and reliability problems. It’s important to work with a team who has deep experience with electromagnetic simulation such as low-frequency applications such as electric motors to high-frequency applications such as sensors and antennas. There are many aspects to setting up multiphysics models correctly, never mind understanding the tools behind them. The good news is when you do work with experienced consultants (like Adaptive), we can help establish a testing and analysis process from concept through to final validation phases. Further, the process will also document and incorporate these tests into your design process so that you know why decisions got made and have access to the supporting data behind it.

6. Compliance with environmental and regulatory requirements

Consumers are hot on environmental-friendly products, and high-tech companies have the opportunity to work with materials that are recyclable and have better sustainability. Beyond pleasing consumers, high tech companies need to make sure they are in compliance with RoHS and other local regulations as it relates to their product life and obsolescence. A strong PLM platform can help ensure that the right steps are documented and signed off to meet compliance regulations.

Overall, the eBook supports an integrated platform for PLM to bring together ECAD and MCAD systems, the mechanical, electrical and system engineering teams and their design processes. A single version of the truth for data and contextual information (2D and 3D drawings) need to be accessible and a fundamental building block for any product lifecycle management (PLM) platform. Implementing tools that will not only enable but also promote and even require collaboration and virtual simulation, among other functionalities, will enable companies to overcome many of the unique challenges faced by the industry.

To download the ebook, you will need to go to the Tech-Clarity site.

If you want to learn more about how your organization can address these critical business issues with a powerful PLM platform that addresses many of these challenges, call us at (440) 257-7460 or click below to schedule a demo.

Other resources that may be of interest:

On-Demand Webinar: Electromagnetic Simulation for Design & Analysis of Antennas & MW/RF Components

White Paper:  Solving Critical Engineering Challenges for Electric Vehicles

30 Sep 2019

Catch 3DEXPERIENCE Simulation on Wheels in the Midwest

Check out SIMULIA on Wheels with the 3DEXPERIENCE tour coming to a location in the Midwest.  Mark your calendar to check out the mobile playground which is touring from September – November 2019.

On the tour, you will find a playground of interactive experiences that showcases the power of simulation through a virtual replication of the real world, the “3DEXPERIENCE twin.” As your single source of truth, this enables simulation to be fully integrated throughout concept, design, engineering and manufacturing.

View the Tour Dates:

Anyone is welcome to attend the events marked “Open House”.  Technology Days are private events held at a specific organization.

 

 

 

 

06 Aug 2019
Tire Simulation

2019 Tire Symposium: Tire Simulation Driven Design

September 9th, 2019
8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
DoubleTree by Hilton Akron-Fairlawn, Aspen Room

Join Adaptive at this special, complimentary event the day before the 38th Annual Meeting & Conference on Tire Science and Technology. 

You’ll learn how the 3DEXPERIENCE platform can address different tire design & simulation workflows.

Other discussion topics will include:

  • Tire footprint analysis with an integrated design and simulation process, tread meshing & material calibration, all using the 3DEXPERIENCE platform
  • Multiphysics topics including Tire Noise and Wet Traction (Hydroplaning, Wet Grip)
  • Improving tire simulation realism through workflows such as Heat Generation & Heat Transfer, Plunger Energy Test and Manufacturing Simulation

Registration begins at 8 a.m. The symposium will begin at 8:30 and end at approximately 5 p.m. Lunch will be provided.

Seats are filling fast. Act now to reserve your place and take advantage of this free event and see the most advanced approaches in Tire Engineering. The deadline for registration is September 5th, 2019.

Download the agenda.

24 Jun 2019
Aerospace Metrology

Workshop: Optimizing Quality Control in the Aerospace Supply Chain

July 18
Flightdeck Flight Simulation Center
1650 Sinclair Street
Anaheim, CA 92806

Join us for our free workshop from 11 a.m to 5 p.m. in Anaheim. Register today.

Leveraging 3D Model Based Definition (3DMBD) Data in the Aerospace Supply Chain

Speaker: Randy Becker, Senior Quality Inspector, Aerospace OEM

Aerospace OEMs such as Boeing, Gulfstream and Bombardier are changing from a drawing-based authority to a 3D model-based paradigm. Although OEMs have seen substantial cost reduction by eliminating drawings, it has caused a huge impact to the aerospace supply chain. During this session.Randy Becker will present best practices on how to use 3DMBD data to streamline manufacturing operations and ensure OEM quality deliverables are met.

3DMBD – An Aerospace Suppliers Perspective

Speaker: Jamie Young, President, My Machine Inc.

During this presentation, Jamie will present how My Maine uses 3DMBD Data to manufacture, inspect and deliver machined parts to Boeing.

Automating In-Process Inspection with 3D Scanning

Speaker: Frank Thomas, Metrology Specialist, Adaptive Corp.

Speaker: Larry Kuehn, Quality Guru, Adaptive Corp.

In-Process inspection can be a time and resource consuming process. By incorporating Adaptive’s “Universal Metrology Platform,” customers can select a wide range of 3D scanning solutions for fast real-time in-process inspection of production parts. Attendees to this session will learn:

  • What is the Universal Metrology Automation (UMA) Platform?
  • What types of Robots does UMA support?
  • What do we mean by “real-time” inspection?
  • Is there any SPC data collected?
  • How do I compare the physical part to the CAD data nominal with tight tolerances?

*2 – 5 p.m. is an optional tour of the Flight Simulation Center: Experience the thrill of aerial maneuvers at 600 knots and air-to-air combat in an authentic military flight simulator. Feel what it’s like to take the controls of a commercial airliner in our Boeing 737 flight simulator.

08 Apr 2019
Electric Vehicles

How the Growth of Electric Vehicles Will Impact CIOs and Their IT Strategies

It’s no surprise that electric vehicles (EVs) will radically change the automotive industry. The question is if you’re a CIO, do you stay on the sidelines to observe and play conservatively or charge ahead and innovate to grab a share of the market early?

There are suppliers who want to see more certainty and confidence in the market before they dive right in.

But one thing is certain: This shift will drive CIOs to evaluate their current supply chain and rethink their technology. Electrification opens up possibilities that require new software and service platforms for the entire ecosystem. They’ll need to digitally connect with consumers and track things like electricity production, charging stations, and usage. IT can be the driver for mainstream consumer adoption of EVs.

This article gives you a brief summary of a report on electric vehicles by Gartner Analyst Michael Ramsey. You’ll get an overview on the potential sales of EVs, what CIOs in the automotive industry need to know in planning for the future, and what obstacles could slow progress.

Let’s first look at the stats to see the projected growth of EVs.

EV Growth Over the Next Decade

In the last four years, EV sales have tripled, but it’s expected to jump more steadily moved forward. In 2018, production of battery electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles was 1.8 million (1.8% of total vehicles).

According to Gartner, over the next five years automotive companies will spend approximately $260 billion launching more than 200 new EV models.

Edison Electric Institute and the Institute for Electric Innovation forecast approximately 7 million electric vehicles will be traveling on U.S. roads by the end of 2025.

It is projected to take about 10 years to hit mass EV ownership. By 2030, LMC Automotive forecasts sales of battery electric vehicles to climb to 18.1 million. That means hybrid and EVs could make up 48% or more of all car sales in 2030.

What Changes Will EVs Drive?

With the rise of EVs come big changes—from the auto industry to the electricity system to the consumer level. On the other hand, EVs introduce possibilities of competitive advantages in speed, quality, and lower costs. Gartner explains the adjustments CIOs have to consider and the actions they can take preparing for the long term.

There are several major changes, but here we’ll look at two of them.

2 Changes of the EV Effect:

1. EVs reduce part complexity with fewer moving parts.

Mechanically it’s simpler. Gartner interviewed experts at the engineering firm, Munro & Associates. They explained that EVs don’t need parts like the internal combustion engine, transmission , or exhaust systems making the mechanics simpler.

The complexity shifts to the electrical components for things like the electric drive train, reconfigurable interiors, battery and thermal management systems. Electro-mechanical components will also replace hydraulic parts like oil and water pumps.

Benefits: This affects the entire supply chain and means shorter development and assembly times.

Gartner recommends CIOs evaluate and rethink the following:

  • Evaluate the current supply chain.
    • Do your current PLM systems have the capabilities to devleop EVs?
    • Is manufacturing capable of executing the assembly?
    • What is needed to revamp the supply chain and does the existing ERP system work well with it?
  • Compare current software platforms to new third-party software.
    • CIOs should work with engineers, finance, and manufacturing to evaluate existing software and compare new third-party software designed for EVs. Once they determine the shortest path with the best quality and lowest cost, then they can decide if it’s time to change vendors.
  • Develop a case to move to the cloud.
    • IT is responsible for providing smooth communications internally and with customers. now is the time to develop a case to move to cloud-based software that will enable the organization to streamline their operations and information exchange and seamlessly connect to consumers and their EVs.

2. Electrification opens up new opportunities to collaborate.

This is the time to rethink your ERP system and focus on long-term customer experience beyond the sale of the EV. This means collaboration with other companies in the ecosystem and with consumers.

Gartner’s recommendations:

Gartner recommends CIOs use IT to help gather and share information with all parties on critical matters such as charging these vehicles safely, conveniently, and cost effectively. Consumer trust is at stake every step of the way.

Some suggestions include:

  • Create a new system for charging capabilities.
    • Collaborate with utility CIOs to provide vehicle location and charging status to help them plan for electricity production and usage.
    • Work internally and with ERP vendors to create a new system that handles charging issues like battery state of charge (SoC), charging availability, and billing solutions.
    • Create an ongoing dialogue with consumers through new digital services.
  • Develop industry standards and universal charging access to network providers.
    • CIOs can collaborate with and create connections between charging network providers and EV owners through cloud-based identification so they’re not left without resources.
  • Prepare for blockchain solutions for accountability or innovation.
    • Understand and prepare for blockchain solutions where the data is decentralized, easily verifiable, continually updated, and securely validated. Blockchain would allow for accountability of energy generation and energy usage credits for charging EVs.

Obstacles

Even though the future shows high projected growth, there are obstacles that could slow the rise and adoption of EVs.

Some of these obstacles are:

  1. Recharging times still too long: Could take 30 minutes to 12 hours at a charging station.
  2. Lack of public charging stations: Limited charging ability in the workplace and along the highways.
  3. Unacceptable driving ranges: Current driving ranges fall short of the average consumer’s expectations of 245-300 miles before battery needs charging.
  4. Lack of universal connector standards: High-voltage fast charging stations require multiple adapters not usable in some EVs.
  5. Lack of universal access to chargers: Chargers are part of either free, subscription-based, or closed-access disparate networks with limited connections between them.
  6. Consumer appeal has dropped: Higher EV pricing, low gas prices, loss of consumer interest in fuel efficiency, and end of tax credits has limited the appeal to switching to EVs.
  7. Billing and accountability challenges: Challenges in billing and accountability for generating energy and tracking production and usage.
  8. Need more education on EVs: Many consumers don’t understand the difference between an EV and a hybrid, the advantages of EVs, and what car manufacturers really offer.

These 8 obstacles are just a few of the challenges today that could impact the growth of EVs. However, they won’t stop the movement to electrification.

Gartner suggest CIOs understand and keep on top of the obstacles, changes, and opportunities. Evaluate their existing supply chain and IT strategy. Then study the recommendations to prepare for this shift.

CIOs must implement changes that make sense for their company to successfully impact the EV market. Automakers have to strike a balance between ROI and developing smarter technologies that delight and build trust with consumers.

Summary

There is high projected growth in electric vehicles in the next decade. As with any industry disruption, obstacles will get in the way and could slow the rise and adoption of EVs, but won’t stop it.

Electrification will create disruptive changes with new possibilities for CIOs and their IT systems in the automotive industry.

Two major changes include:

  • EVs reduce part complexity with fewer moving parts and will disrupt the supply chain.
  • Electrification opens up new opportunities to collaborate.

IT can be the driver for mainstream consumer adoption of electric vehicles. It’s important for CIOs in this industry to watch the progress, understand the implications, and take advantage of new opportunities with electrified vehicles to succeed.

For more in depth information please read the full Gartner report, “What a CIO Needs to Know About the Rise of Electric Vehicles.”

Do you need help to evaluate your supply chain? We’d be happy to discuss a complete Digital to Physical Product Lifecycle solutions. Contact us today.

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