Part 2: Understanding PLM Fundamentals | Adaptive Corp

Part 2: Understanding PLM Fundamentals

PLM Fundamentals

Part 2: Understanding PLM Fundamentals

PLM is rooted in technical data and processes, but it has evolved to also encompass a variety of non-technical roles and teams. Everyone from engineers to marketing, purchasing, and sales reps create, use, and/or rely on the product information that’s managed through PLM. Engineering and purchasing access CAD files. Purchasing and inventory access bills of materials (BOMs). Sales and marketing access sales orders, product images and information. And corporate executives and managers rely on data and other information to make more informed business decisions (business intelligence).

The value of PLM—and a PLM platform —is that product data is accessible from a central repository where everyone can find what they need and it enables collaboration across teams who are responsible for product development. This repository reduces the burden on individual departments, especially engineering, that no longer have to respond to multiple requests for information tailored to another department’s needs.

PLM Drives Data Management

A centralized location ensures continuity of data around all product information—this is vital and affects many departments. Top PLM systems ensure lots of people can access, work with, and even change full, rich product data in the PLM system without the data getting out of sync. That also means improved collaboration across the enterprise—it’s easier for everyone to find and work on the latest version of a file.

PLM is Useful Whether You’re Big or Small

PLM has long been seen as the province of large companies producing complex products. Dozens of teams work on a single product, each focusing on one tiny step or element in the manufacturing process. The challenge in those organizations is getting each focused team to consider the bigger picture and work with other teams when necessary. But the size of the company has little to do with the complexity of a product, and these days, with improved technology and automation, very complex products might be produced by small teams.

PLM’s emphasis on data management and collaboration is as important for a small company as it is for a company of 200,000. At a small company, an individual might play more than one role, such as a technical role in the morning and a sales or marketing role in the afternoon. That’s where PLM shines, because it helps the multi-tasking individual switch between roles, needs, and information seamlessly. PLM systems help manage all the information the worker requires for whatever role they’re playing at the moment.

PLM software solutions, in particular, can be of enormous value to organizations, as a tool to improve collaboration and communication. Working with an experienced solution provider like Adaptive, we can help you wherever you are at in your software journey. Some of our customers just use a CAD or PDM system and want to evolve to something more comprehensive, others may have experienced failed PLM and don’t know where to go next. We can help give you the right information and tools you need to help your organization move forward.  We invite you to contact us, we are here to help.

This post is part of a 2-post blog series.  Read the first post here: Part 1: Understanding PLM, PDM and More

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