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Tag: 3D Printing

10 May 2018

Adaptive in the News: Design2Part A New Era of 3D Printing

In this Design2Part article, Frank Thomas explains how 3D Printing has evolved as a valid approach for manufacturers to enhance their agility on the plant floor by employing 3D printing for additive manufacturing. Whether they create replacement parts, tooling or jigs, the advancements in the durability of materials has enabled 3D Printing to be a dependable solution that is more affordable than ever before. Here are a few excerpts from Frank:

Thomas said that until fairly recently, additive manufacturing was used most often as a tool to create parts that you could hand to somebody so that they could see it, touch it, and provide some input as to what might need to be changed or modified. But that’s changed in recent years as new materials have been developed that enable printers to make stronger, more durable parts.

“Metal printing has always been there, but that has an economic value proposition that’s a bit challenging for it,” he said in an interview. “The ABS and nylon and other plastic 3D printers, up until the last couple of years, weren’t necessarily dimensionally accurate, and then they had challenges creating a part that’s functional. That’s what I think is different about the market today, compared to just, really, a couple of years ago.”

If the demand for 3D printed metal parts is going to grow significantly, especially for critical use cases, OEMs will have to be able to count on high-quality parts. Thomas believes the additive metal industry is up to the challenge because he’s already seen major improvements in quality in recent years.

“At the end of the day, this is really a materials game. If the materials that we’re able to bring to the market provide the end use quality that people are looking for, that’s critical.”

Read the entire article here

09 Apr 2018

Overcoming Manufacturing Challenges with Composite & Metal 3D Printing

Both composite 3D printing and metal 3D printing are invaluable resources on the production line. They are often used to affordably and efficiently produce many of the low volume, high-strength, custom parts critical to manufacturing. In this paper from Markforged, you’ll learn how composite and metal 3D printing technologies can work together to optimize your digital manufacturing processes.

Examples of 3D printed tooling applications include:

  • Conformal Workholding for Metal Printed Parts

If a part can be 3D printed in metal, conformal workholding for the part can easily follow. Printing composite workholding for processing metal 3D printed parts solves the conformal work holding problem efficiently-whether for tapping, post machining, or QA inspection.

  • Tooling, Jigs and Fixtures

Using industrial 3D printers for tools, jigs, and fixtures can drop costs and cut lead time by over 90%, delivering high­strength, long-lasting parts next day.

Breaking your tools down into material-specific regions can optimize their properties while dropping cost and time to manufacture. Below are some properties that can be localized by splitting parts into metal and composite segments.

Download the white paper to explore application use cases from conformal workholding to tooling inserts, and discover how composite and metal 3D printing technologies from Markforged can help you overcome common tooling and fixturing roadblocks.

 

Here are a couple other related blog posts that may be of interest:

Not Just for Parts: Additive Manufacturing Delivers Benefits with Tooling

Additive Manufacturing Deep Dive (Part 2): Every Part is Custom

22 Feb 2018
Visit Adaptive Corp at AD&M Cleveland

Advanced Design & Manufacturing Expo 2018

Join Adaptive Corporation at the Advanced Design and Manufacturing Expo
March 7 & 8, Huntington Convention Center, Cleveland, OH
Adaptive Corporation Booth #510 (3D Printing Pavilion)

Breaking News

Don’t Miss the  2018 Keynote Speaker John Ratzenberger
Actor | Entrepreneur | Industry Advocate
March 7, 2018 | 1:00 pm | Center Stage

 

Visit Adaptive Corp at AD&M ClevelandThe Advanced Design & Manufacturing Expo showcases the latest in robotics, automation, plastics, packaging, and design engineering technology. The AD&M conference attracts professionals from a number of industry sectors including medtech, aerospace, automotive, and more. You can visit over 250 suppliers, connect with 2600+ professionals, and attend over 30 hours of education sessions.

The best news… It’s Free!

While you’re there, take a minute to stop by the Adaptive booth and learn about the newest PLM solutions from Dassault Systèmes, 3D printing technology from MarkForged, 3D scanning products from Creaform, and more.

Top 5 Reasons to Attend Ohio’s Leading Industry Conference

  1. Unlimited Track Hopping: Choose any session across all four tracks to build the agenda that’s right for you.
  2. Leading Education: Get up to speed on key industry topics including 3D printing, smart manufacturing, hybrid vehicles, collaborative robots, machine learning, IIoT, and more.
  3. Undisputable Value: This is the only event of its kind in the region, featuring 30+ hours of in-depth, expert-led education—and it’s free!
  4. Exclusive Networking: Make connections with industry professionals at receptions and networking activities throughout the two-day conference.
  5. Curated Tours: Join a tour of the show floor to meet top suppliers and dive deep into cutting-edge topics.

Learn more about the AD&M Expo

21 Dec 2017

Markforged’s Guide to 3D Printing on the Production Line

Markforged has released a new Guide to 3D printing on the production line. 

3D Printing on the Production LineMany manufacturers have realized significant cost savings and productivity improvements by integrating high strength additive manufacturing (AM) technology into their business, especially in support of their maintenance, repair and operations (MRO) strategy. For many more, identifying where additive will be most impactful to their business can be a daunting task, and increasingly one that corporate leadership has directed plants to investigate. This white paper provides structure and clarity to that ask by demonstrating strategies and applications for integrating high strength AM opportunities on the manufacturing floor.

Download the white paper.

18 Aug 2017
Additive Manufacturing

Additive Manufacturing: Pushing the Boundaries of What’s Possible

Additive ManufacturingFor decades, the way you manufactured parts—whether for prototyping, tooling, or production—was simple: machining metal. You started with a chunk or bar of metal and carved away bits of it to create the part. This subtractive process (now sometimes known as “subtractive manufacturing”) is a tried and true method, but it’s necessarily limiting, particularly when it comes to internals. Since the outer shell of a shape is often the strongest part of its structure, any breach of that—say, to add definition or carve away unnecessary internal bulk—compromises structural integrity.

But then there was a revolution in manufacturing, courtesy of additive manufacturing (AM). The term encompasses a variety of processes, including material extrusion, material jetting, and photopolymerization, but the most widely known and accessible of them is 3D printing. In the early days of 3D printers, parts could be made only of nylon or ABS “thread,” but as the technology has developed, manufacturers gain increasing flexibility and freedom through the ever-growing list of materials that can be used for printing—including metal.

Early uses of additive manufacturing focused on rapid prototyping for pre-production visualization models—that’s what plastic parts were mostly good for. But as materials such as carbon fiber, fiberglass, Kevlar, and metal join the toolset, and as quality is equal or superior to traditional manufacturing processes, AM can be utilized for a wide variety of needs. AM can make everything from quick, nylon parts for fit-checks to end-use metal or Kevlar parts for aircraft, automobiles, dental work, medical implants, and more.

Choosing AM yields a variety of benefits, from the strength and integrity of the parts and related assemblies to efficiency and cost savings in the manufacturing process. To start with, AM parts require less material to create and generate less waste, since you’re building parts up, not cutting them away. That means you can use less of expensive materials—along with new, high-performance materials—and make optimal use of material properties. AM parts also result in increasingly sophisticated designs, because designers can make complex, internal structures—the kind of shapes that simply can’t be machined—that preserve strength and structural integrity while significantly saving money and weight.

In addition, creating parts via AM also helps the overall manufacturing process. AM is faster: parts that once had to be sent out for weeks or months to be machined can now be created in a day—and AM devices can work around the clock. If necessary, small groups of parts in a production run, or individual ones, can be modified with little turnaround time and zero tooling changes required. In some cases, such as short-run production, it might even be more cost-effective to produce all parts via AM, rather than manufacturing molds, die, and tools with which to make the parts.

When additive manufacturing processes are integrated with engineering and simulation software, engineers and designers can simulate and test designs before they get to commercial production and significantly reduce the cost of pre-production development.

Additive manufacturing won’t ever replace what forging, casting, and machining excel at, but the new processes and materials can help reduce costs and shorten turnaround time for parts production. At the same time, AM also helps push the boundaries of what it’s possible to manufacture—such as replacement parts for the human body—as well as how production fundamentally works.