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Tag: PLM

03 Apr 2018

John Hayes of Engineering.com to Present Keynote Address at Adaptive User Conference

We are pleased to announce that John Hayes, President of Engineering.com will present the keynote address at the 2018 Adaptive Corporation User Conference.  This event is scheduled for June 11 to 13, 2018 at the Abbey Resort in Fontana, Wisconsin. Below is a brief summary of what he will share with our customers:

Six Reasons Why Your Product Design Practices Won’t Survive in 2020

John Hayes, President of Engineering.com
John Hayes, President Engineering.com

Whether product designers want to admit it or not, tectonic shifts in consumption patterns, manufacturing, and design technology are upon us. In this presentation, John Hayes of Engineering.com, an expert in design technology with over 20 years of experience working in and covering the field, will break down the 6 reasons why traditional product design practices won’t survive in 2020.

One change that will affect product teams across every industry from CPG to transportation to industrial products is the demand for products that can be purchased as services, leaving the manufacturer with responsibility for the performance of their products in the field. Another is that design teams will be under even greater pressure to shorten their design and production cycles to hit shrinking windows for product launches.

Traditional design processes and technology are a poor match for this new environment. However, new technologies promise to allow design teams to adapt and even thrive. Are they the real deal, or are they over-hyped?

About the Speaker

John Hayes is the President of Engineering.com and also serves as its PLM editor and chief data cruncher. He has published and presented extensively on technologies for product design such as PLM and IoT. Every year, John conducts research studies on the state of technology for product realization and presents those findings through research reports and live events.

John has an MSc in Industrial Administration from Carnegie Mellon University. Prior to Engineering.com, John was a management consultant specializing in data analysis and strategy development.Join us at our upcoming User Conference

23 Mar 2018
POWER'BY for 3DEXPERIENCE Introduction

Digital Twins Powered by POWER’BY?

UPDATE: Power’By is now PLM Collaboration Services?

In this blog post by Jonathan Scott of Razorleaf, he shares how the Dassault Systèmes POWER’BY capability on the 3DEXPERIENCE platform can help with Digital Twin initiatives.  He states that POWER’BY represents a “useful evolution in CAD authoring tools… and helps overcome the deficiencies in current CAD tools today”.

Other POWER’BY highlights he mentioned include:

  • Makes it easier for non-CAD users to quickly imagine new mechanical designs simply by mashing-up parts of BOMs of existing products
  • Takes advantage of high-end downstream capabilities, like DELMIA manufacturing planning and SIMULIA simulation without first having to rip-and-replace, or translate data from, their existing mid-range CAD tools
  • Enables users of any 3D CAD tool to leverage their data into instance-specific, digital twin models

To read Jonathan’s whole article, click here.

 

03 Aug 2017

Part 2: Understanding PLM Fundamentals

PLM is rooted in technical data and processes, but it has evolved to also encompass a variety of non-technical roles and teams. Everyone from engineers to marketing, purchasing, and sales reps create, use, and/or rely on the product information that’s managed through PLM. Engineering and purchasing access CAD files. Purchasing and inventory access bills of materials (BOMs). Sales and marketing access sales orders, product images and information. And corporate executives and managers rely on data and other information to make more informed business decisions (business intelligence).

The value of PLM—and a PLM platform —is that product data is accessible from a central repository where everyone can find what they need and it enables collaboration across teams who are responsible for product development. This repository reduces the burden on individual departments, especially engineering, that no longer have to respond to multiple requests for information tailored to another department’s needs.

PLM Drives Data Management

A centralized location ensures continuity of data around all product information—this is vital and affects many departments. Top PLM systems ensure lots of people can access, work with, and even change full, rich product data in the PLM system without the data getting out of sync. That also means improved collaboration across the enterprise—it’s easier for everyone to find and work on the latest version of a file.

PLM is Useful Whether You’re Big or Small

PLM has long been seen as the province of large companies producing complex products. Dozens of teams work on a single product, each focusing on one tiny step or element in the manufacturing process. The challenge in those organizations is getting each focused team to consider the bigger picture and work with other teams when necessary. But the size of the company has little to do with the complexity of a product, and these days, with improved technology and automation, very complex products might be produced by small teams.

PLM’s emphasis on data management and collaboration is as important for a small company as it is for a company of 200,000. At a small company, an individual might play more than one role, such as a technical role in the morning and a sales or marketing role in the afternoon. That’s where PLM shines, because it helps the multi-tasking individual switch between roles, needs, and information seamlessly. PLM systems help manage all the information the worker requires for whatever role they’re playing at the moment.

PLM software solutions, in particular, can be of enormous value to organizations, as a tool to improve collaboration and communication. Working with an experienced solution provider like Adaptive, we can help you wherever you are at in your software journey. Some of our customers just use a CAD or PDM system and want to evolve to something more comprehensive, others may have experienced failed PLM and don’t know where to go next. We can help give you the right information and tools you need to help your organization move forward.  We invite you to contact us, we are here to help.

This post is part of a 2-post blog series.  Read the first post here: Part 1: Understanding PLM, PDM and More

30 Jun 2017

Part 1: Understanding PLM, PDM, and More

We’ve all heard the buzzwords: digital transformation, product lifecycle, product data, PLM, PDM, systems engineering, models-based engineering and so on. It can be confusing, trying to figure out which technology or trend will have the biggest impact on the business. It’s also easy to imagine you’re missing out on a new, hot trend. But before we worry about whether we’re ahead of the curve or behind it, let’s be clear exactly what we’re talking about.

Defining Terms

Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) as a term has been around since the 1950s—it is not a new concept, but recently, more organizations are looking at this process as a place for improvement. A product lifecycle is simply the stages a product goes through from the initial concept to end of life—whether that’s a complex manufactured product like a rocket or a simpler product such as a house or a winter coat.

Product lifecycle management is the set of processes and/or procedures used to manage all of the product’s information throughout the lifecycle—from inception and planning; to design, engineering, and manufacture; to service and disposal.

At Adaptive, we have defined the product lifecycle to start with the digital design process and continues into the physical side of manufacturing for prototyping, testing, first article inspection, and quality control.

Is PDM also PLM?

But what about product data management (PDM)? Where does that fit?

As the words imply, PDM involves managing the information about a product, from models and drawings to bills of materials (BOMs) and more. But PDM shouldn’t be equated with PLM. PDM is about the data involved in managing all the data around the development of a product – product specifications, version control and more. PLM calls on the data in PDM to manage the entire digital design process.

Systems Engineering

Systems engineering is also sometimes confused with PLM, but that focuses on how to design and manage systems (which almost always include products). It’s the overall organization and oversight of a system, as well as the people and processes that ensure all aspects of a system are considered and integrated into a whole. PLM, which focuses on everything about the product, can sometimes help automate design processes related to systems engineering. But generally speaking, systems engineering has a broader scope, as it also includes the coordination of teams, logistics, and other responsibilities outside of the product stream.

Models-based Systems Engineering

Within systems engineering is the concept of models-based system engineering (MBSE). MBSE establishes a “model” to analyze and document key aspects of the systems engineering life cycle which includes system requirements, analysis, design, and validation and verification activities. Similar to a PLM, it is intended to improve communications within engineering teams and other stakeholders, it provides early identification of requirements issues, improves specification of allocated requirements to hardware and software resulting in fewer errors during integration and testing and provides requirements traceability, reduces project risks and lowers costs, and more.

Digital Transformation

The idea behind digital transformation is to establish a process for organizations to track the entire cross-functional cycle of product development capturing and integrating key data points to establish traceability and manage how a product is conceived, created, tested, and brought to market. In essence, the data trail creates a “digital thread” that captures the evolution of that product.  Of course, this doesn’t happen all at once and needs to be taken in discrete steps that build success upon success.  In some cases a digital thread will extend beyond the walls into the supply chain, this is the ultimate nirvana. However, many organizations are not quite ready for that just yet and it is more talk than anything. However, the concept of establishing a digital thread goes hand in hand with PLM and systems engineering strategies.  The transformation part happens when there is a more collaborative approach in an organization when everyone is working off the same data and making better business decisions. We will be writing more on this topic later.

In Conclusion

As you can see, product development covers a broad spectrum in an enterprise as it tends to touch many functional departments as work gets completed across an organization. In some cases a business problem on the surface may not “appear” to be a PLM issue, but in many cases due to collaboration needs, managing product changes, and tracking all documentation it quickly becomes something a PLM strategy can affect.

Stay tuned for our next post where we will dive a little deeper into Understanding PLM Fundamentals…

10 Mar 2017

Come See Us at the COE 2017 Annual Experience and TechniFair

We will be exhibiting at COE 2017, April 23-26 in Orlando so be sure to stop by our booth.

The conference brings together expert users of Dassault Systèmes solutions. While at the conference you can take advantage of over 100 hours of education specifically designed around industry best practices and user experiences. It will also feature over 30 hours of hands-on labs through the COE University.

Some of the sessions you may want to attend include:

  • 3DEXPERIENCE coexistence with CATIA V5 for Design Review
  • (NC) DELMIA Multi-Axis Machining Essentials (MMG)
  • Democratizing & Managing Simulation via the 3DEXPERIENCE V+R Process Applications
  • Design, Develop, Deliver: Overcoming Challenges with Fabrication + Installation
  • Composites Manufacturing: From Virtual Part to Production

The conference will also feature specific how-to presentations from Dassault Systèmes including:

  • Using Carbon Fiber Composite 3D Printing to create Tooling and Fixtures for Manufacturing
  • Upgrading ENOVIA V6 to 3DEXPERIENCE Platform
  • SIMULIA Model-Based Optimization
  • Load Balancers – How-to for the 3DEXPERIENCE platform

Find out more and register for the conference now.